joe keinberger macabria cadabra records vinyl single
01 joe keinberger macabria cadabra records vinyl single
02 joe keinberger macabria cadabra records vinyl single
joe keinberger macabria cadabra records vinyl single
01 joe keinberger macabria cadabra records vinyl single
02 joe keinberger macabria cadabra records vinyl single

Joe Keinberger’s Macabria

New Condition

$31.57

Joe Keinberger’s Macabria 7″ read by Joe Keinberger & scored by Chris Bozzone.

* Limited pressing on black 150 gram vinyl
* Hand screen printed sleeve
* Insert with foreword by Joe Keinberger
* Art by Joe Keinberger

Pre-order now — Due in Next Saturday (30th Oct) Our pre-orders typically sell out before stock arrives. Order now to avoid disappointment. If you're ordering other items too, when checking out you can combine shipping with your pre-orders to save money, or have them delivered separately for immediate dispatch. We endeavour to dispatch pre-orders the day they arrive. We'll email you to let you know they're on their way, and provide tracking details if applicable.
* Expected arrival dates are approximate and can't be guaranteed. We'll notify you via email of any delays as soon as possible.
5 AVAILABLE

Thanks to author Joe Keinberger’s reading of the selections contained within Macabria, listeners to this new 7-inch will feel as though the writer is sitting beside them, while composer Chris Bozzone takes up residence just a little ways away to create nerve-jangling sounds to increase their sense of fright.

“The King October” is a poem paying homage to the end of harvest and beginning of decay, while also a paean to the Halloween season. Solid bell-like tones ring sonorously behind Keinberger’s echoing voice while a piano has its keys pushed with savage intensity. This piece sets the tone for the entirety of the collection, wherein the author’s voice and words are paired with sounds more akin to musique concrete than a traditional score.

Within “Coven,” the author has his voice reverberate, as though it’s shaking the very Gates to Hell mentioned in its opening lines. The bells in this piece chime first in one ear, and then the other, back and forth throughout this tale of dead souls, as a church organ pierces the darkness, “swirling and glimmering” as the ghosts themselves do.

“The Town Without Spring,” “A Witch’s Curse,” and “Year’s End” are as one, as though the curse of the latter is what afflicts the town in the middle, where “nightmare screams pierced the October darkness,” and the fiends taking flight at the end, awaiting Samhain coming once again.

A ringing handbell peals repeatedly in the far distance as Keinberger’s recitation of what befell this now-cursed place, where “the dead walk the earth.” As the final poem begins, the darkly ethereal, slightly decayed synthesizer is paired once again with a piano, but this time, its tones are gentle, as though welcoming the incoming new year.